Kane puts wedding, Test dream before IPL

Kane puts wedding, Test dream before IPL

Fast bowler Kane Richardson is the latest Australian to make the brave decision to forgo Indian Premier League riches and prioritise the longest format of the game.

The 26-year-old, one of the KFC Big Bash League’s leading performers in recent seasons, revealed that he decided against putting in for a fourth stint in cricket’s most lucrative T20 competition, instead electing to put his Test ambitions before financial gain.
Richardson has one other good reason to sit out the IPL.

“I’m actually getting married in April,” he told cricket.com.au. “A bit of pressure to stay at home this year.”
As a 21-year-old with only six first-class matches to his name, Richardson was picked up for a cool $US700,000 by the Pune Warriors for the 2013 edition of the IPL, before returning to play for Rajasthan Royals the following year and then Royal Challengers Bangalore in 2016.

Considering his strong BBL|07 form (he claimed 12 wickets at 26 in his first season with the Melbourne Renegades, while his economy rate of 8.06 is a solid figure considering he bowls primarily in the Power Play and at the death) and the fact Australian fast bowlers are always in high demand by IPL clubs, Richardson would likely have been a hot commodity at the auction.
The other three quicks in Australia’s T20I squad – Andrew Tye (purchased by Kings XI Punjab for $A1.4m), Ben Dwarshuis (Kings XI, A$271,000) and Billy Stanlake (Sunrisers Hyderabad A$97,000) – all earned IPL deals, as did the likes of Mitchell Starc, Pat Cummins, Mitchell Johnson, Ben Laughlin, Jason Behrendorff and Nathan Coulter-Nile.

But, just as Starc, Josh Hazlewood, Mitch Marsh and Peter Handscomb have all done in recent seasons, Richardson has put the longest format first and opted to skip the tournament.

“It’s a hard decision because of the financial rewards,” he explained. “Not a lot of guys do it.

“I’ve put in a little bit more of a goal to play more Shield cricket and I thought if I play upwards of seven Shield games, the body is going to need a fair bit of a rest.

“I experienced it (the IPL) as a young bloke and made a little bit of money over there so that makes it easier having had that happen.

“I’m still only 27 next so hopefully I can get over there a few more times.”
Richardson’s 20 international matches have all come in one-day and T20 cricket but he’s making a concerted effort to put his name forward for Test cricket.

Last summer was a breakout Sheffield Shield campaign for the South Australian, claiming 32 wickets at 26 before injury struck at the back-end of the season and was ultimately an unlucky omission for the Redbacks’ Shield final clash with Victoria.

The right-armer has again missed time through injury this season and is realistic about his Baggy Green prospects.

“I’m still a long way away from playing Test cricket but it’s still a goal to play,” Richardson said.

“Whether or not (missing) the IPL helps that, I’m not sure.

“I’m pretty big on giving the body a rest and building back up through the preseason in Adelaide and hopefully playing more cricket throughout our home summer.”

Richardson has gone at a little more than six runs per over in Australia’s two wins to begin their Gilette T20 tri-series, and will again lead the attack on Saturday night at the MCG against England.

Gillette T20 trans-Tasman Tri-Series

Australia squad: David Warner (c), Aaron Finch (vc), Ashton Agar, Alex Carey, Ben Dwarshuis, Travis Head, Chris Lynn, Glenn Maxwell, Kane Richardson, D’Arcy Short, Billy Stanlake, Marcus Stoinis, Andrew Tye, Adam Zampa.

England squad: Eoin Morgan (c), Sam Billings, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Tom Curran, Liam Dawson, Alex Hales, Chris Jordan, Dawid Malan, Liam Plunkett, Adil Rashid, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes, James Vince, David Willey, Mark Wood.

New Zealand squad: Kane Williamson (c), Tom Blundell, Trent Boult, Tom Bruce, Colin de Grandhomme, Martin Guptill, Anaru Kitchen, Colin Munro, Seth Rance, Mitchell Santner, Ish Sodhi, Tim Southee, Ross Taylor, Ben Wheeler.

Grateful Maxwell’s gift for Carey

Grateful Maxwell’s gift for Carey

Glenn Maxwell was duly lauded for his spectacular match-winning century against England in Wednesday night’s second match of the Gillette T20 tri-series.

The Victorian became the only Australian to have two T20I tons next to his name after blasting an unbeaten 103 from 58 deliveries, highlighted by 10 boundaries and four sixes, at Blundstone Arena.

But the man at the other end when Maxwell cleared the rope to reach the milestone and secure Australia victory with nine balls to spare also deserves recognition.
Wicketkeeper-batsman Alex Carey, playing in his first international T20 series, played a key role in Maxwell’s march to three figures.

With Australia needing two runs to win, the left-hander took a single from the first delivery of the 19th over with Maxwell on 97.

A dot ball followed before Maxwell hammered England paceman Mark Wood over deep mid-wicket to complete his century.

Maxwell acknowledged Carey in the rooms after the match, presenting him with a signed Kookaburra bat.

“To Alex, thanks for getting that single. Great partnership again. Best wishes,” the message read.

The gesture had some light-heartedness attached, with Maxwell writing ‘103’ under his signature.
Maxwell is yet to be dismissed in the ongoing T20 tri-series, having made an unbeaten 40 in the tournament opener against New Zealand.

He is enjoying a golden summer and is presently the JLT Sheffield Shield’s leading run-scorer, hammering a career-best 278 against NSW in December.

The 29-year-old was also the Melbourne Stars’ leading run-scorer in the KFC BBL and has now struck 143 runs in the first two T20Is of this series without being dismissed.

“The positive thing for me with this summer is that when I’ve come back into the Australian team, I’ve been in good form leading into it,” Maxwell said on Wednesday.

“The pleasing thing for me this summer, it’s been a lot more consistent,” he said.

“I’ve been able to consistently get involved in the game and be influential in certain parts. That’s probably the biggest change from this summer (to) last summer where there were mixed results that didn’t warrant selections back into the (national) side.

“I was probably lucky enough to get my opportunity and then get the same scattered results after that.”

Cricket legends fire up on the ice

There were sixes aplenty as cricket took a tentative step into the world of winter sports with the Ice Cricket Challenge in the Swiss Alps.

Some modern greats of the game faced off for a T20 match in the resort town of St Moritz in temperatures below zero degrees.
The match was played on a frozen, snow-covered lake on an artificial turf carpet, with players using traditional cricket gear and a red ball, but wearing normal sports shoes rather than spikes.

Australians Mike Hussey and Andrew Symonds part of the action, while Virender Sehwag and Shahid Afridi captained the respective teams.

Sehwag wasn’t undone by the unusual conditions, hitting five sixes as he scored 62 while Symonds finished with 40 as Sehwag’s XI finished with 9-164 from 20 overs.

Former England international Owais Shah was the match-winner, however, hitting five sixes in his innings of 74 as Afridi’s XI won the match with almost five overs to spare.
While the star-studded tournament is new, cricket has been played on ice in St Moritz for more than 25 years, with the lake’s incredibly thick ice able to withstand more than 200 tons of weight – enough not just for a game for cricket, but also for grandstands to house spectators.

The second of the two matches will be played on Friday night (AEDT).

Sehwag’s XI: Virender Sehwag (c), Tillakaratne Dilshan, Mahela Jayawardene, Mike Hussey, Andrew Symonds, Mohammad Kaif, Joginder Sharma, Ramesh Powar, Ajit Agarkar, Zaheer Khan, Lasith Malinga

Afridi’s XI: Graeme Smith, Matt Prior, Jacques Kallis, Owais Shah, Shahid Afridi, Grant Elliot, Nathan McCullum, Daniel Vettori, Monty Panesar, Abdul Razzaq, Shoaib Akthar.

Finch returns, injured Morgan ruled out

Aaron Finch has returned to Australia’s XI for the third Gillette T20 International against England at the MCG, but exactly where he will bat in the order remains a mystery.

England have suffered a blow with skipper Eoin Morgan ruled out due to a groin injury, with James Vince taking his place in the side and Jos Buttler handed the captaincy.

Australia won the toss and elected to bowl first as they made one change to the side that won by five wickets on Wednesday in Hobart.
Finch, who missed the opening two games of the series as well as the final two ODIs last month due to a hamstring injury, has returned in place of Travis Head.

D’Arcy Short partnered Warner at the top of the order in Australia’s wins over New Zealand and England in the past week, but he’s been listed to bat at No.3 and Finch as an opener.

But Warner kept his cards close to his chest when asked about his batting line-up at the toss, leaving the door open for Short to retain his spot at the top and for Finch to move down the order later tonight.
Adam Zampa, the only specialist wrist-spinner in Australia’s squad, had hoped he would win a recall after being dropped for Wednesday’s match against England.

But selectors have opted to stick with the bowling attack that orchestrated a stunning England collapse of 7-43. Spinners Ashton Agar and Glenn Maxwell collectively claimed 5-25 between them at Blundstone Arena.

“A lot of countries around the world are opting for two wrist-spinners,” Zampa said on Friday.
“It’s just the grounds and the situations we’ve got ourselves in probably that make it a little bit different in Australia.

“We saw the other night that it was the two spinners that changed the game for us so I think definitely having a wrist-spinner that can spin it both ways is always good to have in your team.”

In addition to Morgan’s absence, England have left out paceman Mark Wood in favour of left-arm spinner Liam Dawson.

Australia will seal a spot in the tri-series final (to be held in Auckland on February 21) with victory tonight.

Australia XI: David Warner (c), Aaron Finch, D’Arcy Short, Chris Lynn, Glenn Maxwell, Marcus Stoinis, Alex Carey (wk), Ashton Agar, Andrew Tye, Kane Richardson, Billy Stanlake

England XI: Jason Roy, Alex Hales, Dawid Malan, James Vince, Jos Buttler (c,wk), Sam Billings, Liam Dawson, David Willey, Adil Rashid, Chris Jordan, Tom Curran

Gillette T20 trans-Tasman Tri-Series

Australia squad: David Warner (c), Aaron Finch (vc), Ashton Agar, Alex Carey, Ben Dwarshuis, Travis Head, Chris Lynn, Glenn Maxwell, Kane Richardson, D’Arcy Short, Billy Stanlake, Marcus Stoinis, Andrew Tye, Adam Zampa.

England squad: Eoin Morgan (c), Sam Billings, Jos Buttler, Sam Curran, Tom Curran, Liam Dawson, Alex Hales, Chris Jordan, Dawid Malan, Liam Plunkett, Adil Rashid, Jason Roy, Ben Stokes, James Vince, David Willey, Mark Wood.

New Zealand squad: Kane Williamson (c), Trent Boult, Mark Chapman, Colin de Grandhomme, Martin Guptill, Anaru Kitchen, Colin Munro, Mitchell Santner, Tim Seifert, Ish Sodhi, Tim Southee, Ross Taylor, Ben Wheeler.

Bowling to Lynn: A net bowler’s tale

Journalist Louis Cameron, a former first-class cricketer for Victoria, found out just how intimidating bowling to the world’s most feared T20 batsman can be after joining Australia’s T20 squad for a net session in Hobart

“Lynny, I’ve got cover, fine leg, mid-wicket, long-on and long-off all back. Square-leg’s come up.”

Andrew Tye is yelling out to Chris Lynn from the top of his bowling mark at the Blundstone Arena nets in Hobart. Lynn gives him a thumbs up. Tye, fluoro orange socks pulled up to his shins, is setting his imaginary field, trying to out-think the most feared T20 batsman in Australia.

It’s a knuckle ball. Lynn, crouched and deathly still right until the very last moment, skews it out to the leg-side. “One,” he yells. It’s a single, they agree.

This is a front-row seat to a duel people pay good money to watch. Both players are worth millions. Tye was bought in the Indian Premier League auction for A$1.4 million, and Lynn will pocket $1.86m. The pair are two of the finest exponents of their respective crafts.

Here though, none of that means a thing. Tye wants to knock Lynn over and Lynn wants to hit Tye out of the (imaginary) ground.
Australia’s T20 squad is training two days out from their clash against England and they’ve let a cricket.com.au journalist bowl to them in the nets. Having defeated New Zealand, until recently the world’s top-ranked T20 side, on Saturday, the squad is confident but far from content.

The Aussies are ranked seventh in the world in T20s. They’re hellbent on improving that. The mood at training is laid-back, yet there’s a steely intensity about what they’re doing. No one gets berated for getting out or for bowling a half-volley. The players know when they’ve made a mistake.

Every ball is a mini battle played out with an imaginary field, with batter and bowler each trying to outfox each other. When Lynn hits Tye for a single, it’s a small win for Tye. In a match, that’s Lynn off strike. Tye knows if he bowls his knuckle ball again to Lynn, though, it could easily go for six. Tye has played his trump card, one he’s spent countless hours perfecting. Later, he comes around the wicket and aims for Lynn’s left shin. Don’t give him any room.
I have a little bit of experience of training and playing alongside some of these players. In 2012, I played two first-class games for Victoria and came up against the likes of Steve Smith, Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood on debut. Glenn Maxwell and Aaron Finch played in that Bushrangers side. I didn’t quite crack it at that level and these days I’m very happy playing for my Premier Cricket team, Essendon, in Melbourne’s north-west. I do still get to bowl to international-calibre players, one of the great things about Australia’s Premier club system. Both Maxwell and Cameron White, for example, have this summer played against Essendon on suburban grounds and then, within weeks, played for Australia.

But with utmost respect to Premier Cricket, the intensity and standard of an Australian team’s training session is quite a few levels above. Each of Australia’s batters are impressive in their own way. Finch hits me for one of the biggest sixes I’ve ever been hit for (the slower ball was a bad option) and it’s almost just a pleasure to watch his flowing swing. Maxwell looks like he can hit any bowler, bowling any ball, to anywhere he likes. Ashton Agar seems to pull balls that have no right to be pulled. I did somehow manage to sneak one through and clean bowl Agar. I won’t let him forget that.

How the captain David Warner, in particular, goes about his business is fascinating. At first, he faces “flingers” from an assistant coach wielding a custom-made ball-thrower, a high-tech version of the ones people use to throw tennis balls to their dogs in the park. Warner works on his swing. The coach is wearing a helmet. Warner was among the first batsmen to start hitting today and he won’t stop batting until everyone has left. After he’s faced enough flingers, he faces bowlers, then he faces some more flingers. Of all the batters, Warner is the most intense. He’s in a little bubble for a couple of hours, a picture of concentration.

All of these guys hit the ball HARD. It’s difficult to explain just how quickly balls come flying off their bats. No one is allowed to turn their back on the four nets that are in full swing. Even bowlers walking back to their marks keep an eye on the action.

If Australia’s training in general is a cut above, bowling to Lynn is something else completely. Fast bowler Kane Richardson explains that there’s an aura about him that makes bowlers make errors. Lynn’s reputation precedes him and even very good bowlers do things they wouldn’t normally do when they bowl to him. It’s not easy, says Richardson, but just try to forget it’s Chris Lynn. It’s good advice, but I promptly bowled a huge wide to him, a clumsy attempt to not give him any width. It’s hard not to think about who you’re bowling to.

I’d managed to get in a couple of yorkers to some of the other batters but it somehow seems harder and riskier to bowl one to Lynn. He asks me where my field is (the way he nails most of my offerings, it wouldn’t really matter) and although I think about trying to bluff him like Tye did, I decide keeping third man and fine leg up and having five fielders out in front of the wicket is a better plan. I’m not banking on Lynn mis-hitting one. He hits a few out of the screws and the crack of ball on bat is awesome. It’s difficult not to just watch in awe.

All told, I bowled for the better part of an hour and a half to a fair chunk of the squad, including the bowlers, who are all also very capable at the crease. It’s a pleasure and a thrill to be involved, and a huge eye-opener observing how training at the elite level unfolds.

The head coach, Darren Lehmann, oversees things. He asks Agar if he wants to finish batting and have a bowl. Agar wants to keep batting, he’ll fine-tune his bowling tomorrow. It’s not a trick question – the players take their preparation seriously. Later, Agar goes out onto the ground for some extra fielding work.
Ricky Ponting is there in the nets too, a sounding board for the players. Asking Richardson about his out-swinger. Telling Finch how well he’s hitting them. There are few more respected voices than Ponting’s when it comes to T20 coaching. Ponting hit an unbeaten 98 in the first ever men’s international T20 back in 2005 but has admitted no one took the format all that seriously when it first started. It was a bit of fun, a way to promote an upcoming one-day and Test series. One newspaper reported that although Australia had won that game, their opponents, a New Zealand side wearing retro beige outfits, had won the fashion stakes.

More than a decade on, Lehmann, Ponting, Warner and co are creating a T20 blueprint to help Australia make up ground in a format they’ve lagged behind in. Lynn said on Friday that discussions have started about the next World T20, which remains more than two-and-a-half years away, the only major trophy the men’s team has never won.

It’s not about how you start things, but how you finish it – Jayawardene

It’s not about how you start things, but how you finish it – Jayawardene

Mumbai Indians’ Head Coach talks about the group’s execution as a unit this season, Rohit Sharma’s captaincy and then some.

“We’ll set ourselves up the way we’ve arranged all through the season and ensure that we give ourselves the most obvious opportunity to win. However, toward the day’s end, it’s another session of cricket and that is the means by which we will treat it,” Mumbai Indians’ Head Coach MahelaJayawardenehad said on the eve of the VIVO IPL 2017 Final.

The Mumbai Indians, who met the Rising Pune Supergiant for the fourth time this season, obviously put the past record of losing to RPS thrice back in the hovel as they showed signs of improvement of RPS in an exciting fina.

MI’s Head Coach Jayawardene’s first season as a mentor will be one to recollect as his young men kept their nerves and went onto shield a little aggregate of 129 runs.

From talking about his message to the young men as they went out to bowl and protect the aggregate, keeping their heads high, the marathon season that the group has had,& Rohit’s captaincy, the incredible batsman-turned-mentor says everything in a fresh visit with iplt20.com post the win.

VIVO IPL Fan Parks get bigger and better

VIVO IPL Fan Parks get bigger and better

The VIVO IPL 2017 is just around the corner and cricket fans this season will have more reason to cheer.

Media Advisory

As an inseparable unit with its achievement tenth season, the Indian Premier League is set to re-actuate its tremendously prominent Fan Park activity for the third back to back year. As befits the point of interest tenth period of the IPL, the most recent release of the Fan Park guarantees to be greater and better.

Propelled in 2015, at first in 16 urban areas, the current year’s release of the Fan Park will be held in 36 urban areas in 21 states, bringing fans over the length and broadness of India nearer to their cherished game. These incorporate 14 new urban communities, as Bhubaneswar, Bareilly, Kochi, Ludhiana, Tumkur and Nagercoil which will have the Fan Park out of the blue, and in addition urban communities like Shimla and Shillong, where the enthusiasm for cricket has just as of late detonated into a free for all that keeps on developing with each passing period of the group.

Every scene will communicate all the activity of the IPL Live on monster TV screens, making a stadium-like feel for fans for all intents and purposes in their lawns. Section will be free and besides, there will be music and numerous slows down for stock, nourishment, drinks and different enactments by IPL’s authentic supporters, which will add to the electric air.

Last season saw an enormous turnout of 3,00,000 cricket devotees who encountered the IPL inhabit the Fan Parks. The tenth version is relied upon to produce a more noteworthy turnout with coordinators investigating every possibility to guarantee a fruitful season.

The principal VIVO IPL Fan Park for the 2017 season will be hung on April fifth in Guwahati, Mathura, Aurangabad and Mysore. The commencement has started.

 

Quick Stats: M55 – RPS vs KXIP

Quick Stats: M55 – RPS vs KXIP

2 Number of players to kick it into high gear out to the main wad of the match in the IPL2017. Martin Guptill today joined Chris Gayle, who endured this destiny against Kolkata Knight Riders at Bengaluru.

3 Number of ducks Glenn Maxwell made in the IPL2017. No other chief was expelled without scoring more than once.

5 Number of wickets Kings XI Punjab lost in the initial six overs – joint-most for any side in this release. Delhi Daredevils had two such occasions.

73 Kings XI Punjab’s aggregate – their most minimal ever in the IPL. The past most minimal was 88 against Royal Challengers Bangalore at Bengaluru in 2015.

157 The distinction between Kings XI Punjab’s sums in two back to back matches. They had made 230 for three against Mumbai Indians in their past match before being rejected for 73 today. This is the second most elevated contrast for a group in two successive matches in the IPL. Imperial Challengers Bangalore, in the wake of making 213 against Gujarat Lions, were played out for 49 against Kolkata Knight Riders – a distinction of 164!

2 Number of wicket-attendants to make 100 rejections in the IPL. MS Dhoni joined Dinesh Karthik today with the rejection of Axar Patel. Toward the finish of this match, Dhoni’s count remains at 101, five behind Dinesh Karthik.

48 Number of balls remaining when Rising Pune Supergiant won the match – the second greatest win as far as balls in this version. Unexpectedly, it is Kings XI Punjab that has the greatest such win – with 72 balls to save – against Delhi Daredevils at Mohali.

9 Number of times in the IPL a group including MS Dhoni made it to the last four phase. In the initial 8 versions with the Chennai Super Kings, Dhoni was a piece of the last four on all events. The main other player to have done as such is Suresh Raina

I am proud of Krunal: Hardik Pandya

I am proud of Krunal: Hardik Pandya

Pandya brothers speak on their respective journeys in IPL and how they have been a strong support system for each other.

They have been the toast of the Mumbai Indians battle this year. They have been shrewd accomplices supplementing each other at each level of the opposition. One scores, the other cheers.One bowls, the other catches.The Pandya siblings have made telling commitments in the tenth version of the IPL. All the more so senior sibling Krunal, who has been Mumbai Indians’ utility player with his tricky left-armers and important center request commitments. On the off chance that Krunal set the tone, there would be events when Hardik would play the wrapping up

Krunal was declared the Man of the Match in the VIVO IPL 2017 Final for an essential 47, and sibling Hardik really wanted to be pleased with his senior sibling for securing his lady IPL title. “I am quite recently pleased with him. He has conveyed champion exhibitions over and over in this competition and I am quite recently happy to impart this minute to my sibling,” Hardik stated, talking toiplt20.com. “He has worked hard for this minute and has put in the hard yards throughout the most recent few years. Presently he is here and he genuinely merits it. Champion stuff.”

Krunal had comparable feelings and couldn’t thank his sibling enough for all the help he had given him all through the season. “I give Hardik a ton of acknowledgment for my prosperity,” Krunal said. “Likewise, our folks have constantly bolstered us till date independent of our exhibitions and results. We might likewise want to thank our mentor back home who has helped us all the live long day. Credit to the whole Mumbai Indians bolster staff and group administration who have influenced us to feel like family. Exceptional say for Kiran More sir, whose foundation we have been playing for since adolescence.”

The pair likewise credited the group for setting up a telling execution in the exciting last finished finale. “Only single word rings a bell – Amazing,” shouted Hardik. “The way the young men pulled off this triumph was completely splendid. Rising Pune Supergiant had the amusement in their grasp, yet at the same time our young men adhered to the undertaking and fixed it.”

For Krunal, this was a minute to love and one that will stay carved in his memory for quite a while. “It is a blessing from heaven for me. To play an IPL last and add to a triumphant reason is a pleased inclination. A defining moment, on a major night and to wind up lifting the trophy is an enormous minute for me.”

The Pandya siblings saved an uncommon specify for their mentor back home – Jitendra Singh, for the position they were in their professions right now. Hardik, specifically, was loaded with laud as he stated, “Mentor, we are here a result of you. You are the genuine champion. As a result of you, we are remaining here. I have two IPL trophies and Krunal has one at this point. Much obliged to you for everything.”

Vettori’s inputs helped me grow as a bowler: Negi

Vettori’s inputs helped me grow as a bowler: Negi

In spite of the fact that the last association match of the VIVO Indian Premier League 2017 between the Royal Challengers Bangalore and Delhi Daredevils will make little difference to the race to the playoffs, the two sides would be quick to complete the season on a triumphant note. While the Zaheer Khan-drove Delhi Daredevils have won six amusements, Virat Kohli’s side have just two wins added to their repertoire and are at the base of the table.

While addressing the media in front of the match, Pawan Negi, who is the second most elevated wicket – taker for RCB this season, said to such an extent. “The season clearly turned out poorly yet in the event that we can win the keep going diversion (and complete on a triumphant note) it will be useful for the following year,” he said. “The group that plays well on the day will win. We would like to have a decent amusement,” he included.

While Yuzvendra Chahal guaranteed 14 wickets through the season for RCB, Negi too contributed with 13 wickets for the side. Gotten some information about his show in the competition he stated, “The season so far has been beneficial for me (by and by) and I will attempt and do my best in this last diversion also. I would like to complete the IPL season on a decent note.”

The experience of knocking down some pins close by Chahal and being trained by Daniel Vettori has helped the left-arm spinner. Negi credits the two people for sharing their insight on turn playing when he says, “I learnt a considerable measure from them. Since Daniel Vettori is himself a left-arm spinner, he has been managing me in the nets about what to do, what line to bowl, and so forth. Those sort of tips have helped me a considerable measure.”

“When Vettori went along with us for the camp (in front of the season) I got the chance to address him. When I began playing matches and notwithstanding amid the training diversions he would continue conversing with me and instruct me, how to do, and so forth. At that point as the matches began, he has additionally been controlling me about knocking down some pins as indicated by the wicket. I was taking a shot at that perspective also which has helped,” he expounded.

Talking about playing under Virat Kohli, Negi specified that he appreciated the experience while including, “He is extremely strong on the field and off it too. In the event that you need ask him something you can do that unreservedly without dithering.”

As they play their last session of the season, Negi will play at the Feroz Shah Kotla, his home ground with regards to residential cricket. “I am very eager to play here. Performing on my home ground will help my certainty too and I will endeavor towards that,” he finished up.